Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) | Meaningful Use | CDC

Follow the steps below on how to find, review and acknowledge electronic lab reports

CalREDIE Electronic Lab Reporting (ELR)

FIGURE 1. Number and percentage of laboratories sending electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) and number and percentage of reports that were sent electronically to public health agencies — United States, 2012–2014

Follow the steps below on how to find, review and acknowledge electronic lab reports

Electronic Laboratory Reporting - Oregon

Progress in electronic laboratory reporting has resulted from a new emphasis and improved capacity and preparedness in health departments to address technical and policy issues. National implementation of ELR continues to progress steadily, as evidenced by increases in both the number of laboratories using ELR and the proportion of reports being sent via ELR.

HL7 v2.5.1 Implementation Guide: Electronic Laboratory Reporting To Public Health (US Realm), Release 1 with Errata.

The number of hospitals sending electronic lab reports to public health agencies is increasing and is on track to meet future goals according to a progress from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

HL7 v2.5.1 Implementation Guide: Electronic Laboratory Reporting To Public Health (US Realm), Release 1 with Errata.


Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) allows laboratories to report test results for reportable infectious diseases through an automated and secure process to the statewide disease surveillance system. Laboratories export data from their information systems in a standard file format and send it to ADPH electronically through a secure interface. ELR will replace paper-based reporting for most reportable infectious diseases and may be used for reporting other notifiable laboratory findings, such as cancer pathology reports and blood lead level results. ELR allows for more rapid reporting to public health and reduces the facility’s reporting burden. Electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) potentially can improve the timeliness of notifiable disease case reporting and subsequent disease control activities (), but the extent of this improvement and the resulting effects on the workload of state or local surveillance teams are unknown. To estimate those effects, investigators from the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) evaluated the timeliness of reporting for four notifiable diseases of varying incubation periods: salmonellosis, shigellosis, meningococcal disease, and hepatitis A. Investigators then calculated the potential improvement expected with ELR using the assumption that ELR can reduce to 1 day the time from completion of a diagnostic laboratory test to notification of the county health department (CHD) of the result. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which showed that ELR would reduce the total time from symptom onset to CHD notification of a case by nearly half for salmonellosis (from 12 days to 7 days) and shigellosis (from 10 days to 6 days), but would produce no change for meningococcal disease (4 days) and minimal improvement for hepatitis A (from 13 days to 10 days). In Florida, the benefits of ELR for reporting timeliness likely will vary by disease. The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) supports submission of Electronic Laboratory Reporting for Meaningful Use (MU) from Eligible Hospitals (EH) and Critical Access Hospitals (CAH). NOTE: While not part of Meaningful Use for non-hospital providers, the UDOH can work with any provider that wants to implement ELR to help automate/facilitate the reporting of reportable infectious diseases via ELR. Electronic Lab Reports (ELR) are reports sent to MDH via electronic files from surrounding labs. When this occurs, the lab result is attached to the existing event in the system (based on patient identifiers and disease). If an event doesn’t yet exist for the person, a new event will be automatically created. When a new ELR is received, users are expected to review the lab report and indicate that the report was received.Electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) potentially can improve the timeliness of notifiable disease case reporting and subsequent disease control activities (), but the extent of this improvement and the resulting effects on the workload of state or local surveillance teams are unknown. To estimate those effects, investigators from the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) evaluated the timeliness of reporting for four notifiable diseases of varying incubation periods: salmonellosis, shigellosis, meningococcal disease, and hepatitis A. Investigators then calculated the potential improvement expected with ELR using the assumption that ELR can reduce to 1 day the time from completion of a diagnostic laboratory test to notification of the county health department (CHD) of the result. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which showed that ELR would reduce the total time from symptom onset to CHD notification of a case by nearly half for salmonellosis (from 12 days to 7 days) and shigellosis (from 10 days to 6 days), but would produce no change for meningococcal disease (4 days) and minimal improvement for hepatitis A (from 13 days to 10 days). In Florida, the benefits of ELR for reporting timeliness likely will vary by disease.Electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) potentially can improve the timeliness of notifiable disease case reporting and subsequent disease control activities (), but the extent of this improvement and the resulting effects on the workload of state or local surveillance teams are unknown. To estimate those effects, investigators from the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) evaluated the timeliness of reporting for four notifiable diseases of varying incubation periods: salmonellosis, shigellosis, meningococcal disease, and hepatitis A. Investigators then calculated the potential improvement expected with ELR using the assumption that ELR can reduce to 1 day the time from completion of a diagnostic laboratory test to notification of the county health department (CHD) of the result. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which showed that ELR would reduce the total time from symptom onset to CHD notification of a case by nearly half for salmonellosis (from 12 days to 7 days) and shigellosis (from 10 days to 6 days), but would produce no change for meningococcal disease (4 days) and minimal improvement for hepatitis A (from 13 days to 10 days). In Florida, the benefits of ELR for reporting timeliness likely will vary by disease.